[Humanist] 23.538 news: HASTAC/MacArthur competition; programme closure

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Jan 6 09:48:37 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 538.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    hastac-web at duke.edu                                       (63)
        Subject: Deadline Extended for 2010 HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation
                Digital Media and Learning Competition

  [2]   From:    beadav at aol.com                                            (28)
        Subject: Mellon closes down Mackie's program


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 13:08:03 -0500
        From: hastac-web at duke.edu
        Subject: Deadline Extended for 2010 HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition


Happy New Year!

Here at the HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning
Competition headquarters, we are increasingly excited as the opening of the
online application system draws closer. We can't wait to see the ideas you
have percolating and the many innovative ways you are reimagining learning!

To give you some additional time to shine up those initial applications and
get them ready for prime time, we are happy to announce that we have extended
the Competition timeline. This means that the online application system will
now open and begin accepting applications on January 15th. The due date for
preliminary applications has been extended until January 22nd, while
resubmitted final first round applications (taking into consideration any
public feedback/comments received) will be due no later than February 15th.

Please check out the revised timeline here:
http://www.dmlcompetition.net/timeline.php [1] and feel free to email us
dml at hri.uci.edu [2] with any questions.

I have included below a revised call for the 2010 HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation
Digital Media and Learning Competition with the new submission deadlines.
Please help us get the word out by spreading it through your networks. We
look forward to seeing your applications on January 15th!

Best,

Digital Media and Learning Competition

 

**With apologies for cross-posting**

---PLEASE DISTRIBUTE WIDELY---

*DEADLINE EXTENDED--Application system to open January 15th*

/*****To allow applicants more time to develop their initial applications,
the Competition timeline has been extended by one week. The online
application system will now open and begin accepting applications on January
15th /. The due date for preliminary applications has been extended until
*January 22nd*, while resubmitted final first round applications (taking into
consideration any public feedback/comments received) will be due by *February
15th*. Please reference the revised timeline
here:http://www.dmlcompetition.net/timeline.php [3] *****

The theme of this year's Competition is Reimagining Learning and there are
two types of awards: 21st Century Learning Lab Designers and Game Changers.

Aligned with National Lab Day as part of the White House's Educate to
Innovate Initiative, the 21st Century Learning Lab Designer awards will range
from $30,000-$200,000. Awards will be made for learning environments and
digital media-based experiences that allow young people to grapple with
social challenges through activities based on the social nature, contexts,
and ideas of science, technology, engineering and math.

The Game Changers category—undertaken in cooperation with Sony Computer
Entertainment of America (SCEA) and Electronic Arts (EA), Entertainment
Software Assocation, and the Information Technology Industry Council—will
award amounts ranging from $5,000-$50,000 for creative levels designed with
either LittleBigPlanet™ or Spore™ Galactic Adventures that offer young
people engaging game play experiences and that incorporate and leverage
principles of science, technology, engineering and math for learning.

Each category will include several Best in Class awards selected by expert
judges, as well as a People’s Choice Award selected by the general public.
The online application system will open on January 15 and will include three
rounds of submissions, with public comment at each stage.

Please see www.dmlcompetition.net [4] for all details.

www.hastac.org [5]

www.dmlcompetition.net [6]

www.twitter.com/dmlComp [7]

[1] http://www.dmlcompetition.net/timeline.php
[2] mailto:dml at hri.uci.edu
[3] http://www.dmlcompetition.net/timeline.php
[4] http://www.dmlcompetition.net/
[5] http://www.hastac.org/
[6] http://www.dmlcompetition.net/
[7] http://www.twitter.com/dmlComp


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 16:14:44 EST
        From: beadav at aol.com
        Subject: Mellon closes down Mackie's program



The Chronicle of Higher Education
January 05, 2010, 12:00 PM ET

In Potential Blow to Open-Source Software, Mellon Foundation Closes Grant Program

By Marc Parry

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is closing a grant program that financed a series of high-profile university software projects, leaving some worried about a vacuum of support for open-source ventures.

Mellon’s decade-old Research in Information Technology program, or RIT, helped bankroll a catalog of freely available software that includes Sakai, a course-management system used by Stanford University and the University of Michigan; Kuali, a financial-management program recently rolled out at Colorado State University; and Zotero, a program for managing research sources used by millions. 

Now the foundation plans to eliminate the RIT program as a stand-alone entity, a move that was scheduled to take effect Monday, according to a December letter to grantees obtained by The Chronicle.

Mellon described the change as part of an effort to "consolidate resources" and concentrate on core program areas like the liberal arts, scholarly communications, and museums. RIT will merge into the Scholarly Communications program, which will manage its existing grants. Ira H. Fuchs, RIT’s founder, says his position has been eliminated, as has that of Christopher J. Mackie, RIT’s associate program officer. 

“It might lead to a reduction in funding for people that want to build large-scale open-source software programs for education,” says David Wiley, an associate professor of instructional psychology and technology at Brigham Young University who reported the changes on his blog last month.

Don Waters, Mellon’s program officer for Scholarly Communications and the author of the December letter, did not return a phone call by deadline. Asked what the move would mean for the future, Mr. Fuchs says, "I think that remains to be determined. The honest answer is I don’t know."

RIT spent some $50-million or $60-million since it was established in 2000, according to Mr. Fuchs. One longtime Mellon grantee, Bradley C. Wheeler of Indiana University at Bloomington, says the investments “will prove transformative for higher education.” Had Mellon not stepped in to help set up Sakai, colleges choosing course-management systems would face a “highly monopolistic pricing situation,” he says.

The closure shouldn’t be read as a sign of the foundation divorcing itself from technology, adds Mr. Wheeler, vice president for information technology at Bloomington and chairman of Kuali's board. Indeed, the Scholarly Communications division will be renamed to explicitly reflect that “technology-based grantmaking is part of its mandate,” according to Mr. Waters's letter. 

“I do see Mellon refocusing its IT investments more closely to what they view as the core scholarship of the academy,” says Mr. Wheeler. “That means things that have to do with research and education, more so than things like administrative systems.”

Mellon invested $2.4-million in Sakai, but the founding four universities put in an even greater amount toward the software-development collaboration, Mr. Wheeler notes. The Kuali Foundation's various projects have received more than $6.4-million from Mellon. The financial-software project is "economically viable on its own," Mr. Wheeler says, with a dozen sustaining investors who contribute the equivalent of about $125,000 a year.

But while Mr. Wheeler was ready to declare victory, one outside observer was more cautious.

"I would tactfully say these are still early stage," says Kenneth C. Green, founding director of the Campus Computing Project, noting that Sakai is gaining traction while the Kuali projects are less far along. "The story's not over."

In the small world of foundations that finance higher-ed technology, especially open-education projects, the story is all about one word right now: transition.

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the dominant source of foundation money for open-education content projects, also went through major personnel changes, Mr. Wiley notes. And the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is closing its online-education grant program.



Prof. Richard C. Beacham, FRSA
Director, King's Visualisation Lab, www.kvl.cch.kcl.ac.uk
King's College London, 26 - 29 Drury Lane, London, WC2B 5RL
E-mail: Richard.Beacham at kcl.ac.uk  OR  beadav at aol.com
 
3D Visualisation in the Arts Network www.viznet.ac.uk/3dvisa/ 
Theatron 3 http://cms.cch.kcl.ac.uk/theatron/
The London Charter www.londoncharter.org/





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