[Humanist] 24.609 events: culture; editing; annotation; libraries; brain & body

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Dec 21 11:33:38 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 609.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Geoffrey Rockwell <grockwel at ualberta.ca>                  (85)
        Subject: Culture and Computing

  [2]   From:    Georg Vogeler <georg.vogeler at gmx.de>                      (17)
        Subject: Spring school "Digital scholarly editing" Vienna, 14-
                18.3.2011

  [3]   From:    "Marlies Olensky" <marlies.olensky at ibi.hu-berlin.de>      (40)
        Subject: TPDL 2011 - Call for Proposals for Workshops, Tutorials, and
                Panels

  [4]   From:    Neil Fraistat <nfraistat at gmail.com>                       (41)
        Subject: Open Annotation Collaboration

  [5]   From:    Lennart Nacke <lennart.nacke at acm.org>                     (74)
        Subject: 2nd CfP: Brain and Body Interfaces: Designing for Meaningful
                Interaction


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 19 Dec 2010 17:26:41 -0700
        From: Geoffrey Rockwell <grockwel at ualberta.ca>
        Subject: Culture and Computing


Call for Papers

The Second International Conference on Culture and Computing
(Culture and Computing 2011)

Date: October 20-22, 2011
Venue: The Clock Tower Centennial Hall, Kyoto University, Japan
http://www.ai.soc.i.kyoto-u.ac.jp/culture2011/

International communities have a myriad of problems around topics
such as: population demographic shifts, energy use and creation,
the environment, and food supply. It is necessary to build a
global consensus for resolving problems within these topic areas.
Unfortunately, there are difficulties in communication among
different cultures. Information and communication technologies
are required in order to overcome such difficulties.

There are various research directions in the relations between
culture and computing:
to archive cultural heritages via ICT (cf. digital archives),
to empower humanities researches via ICT (cf. digital humanities),
to create art and expressions via ICT (cf. media art),
to realize a culturally situated agent (cf. cultural agent),
to support multi-language, multi-cultural societies via ICT
(cf. intercultural collaboration), and to understand new cultures
born in the Internet and Web (cf. net culture).

The International Conference on Culture and Computing
(Culture & Computing) will be held in Kyoto, the cultural heart
of Japan, to provide an opportunity to share research issues and
discuss the future of culture and computing. To understand the
proceedings at the previous conference, please visit
http://www.ai.soc.i.kyoto-u.ac.jp/culture2010/index.html.

The second conference (Culture & Computing 2011) will be organized
with an exhibition on the integration of state of the art cultural
computing technologies and Japanese traditional culture,
along with a number of co-located events.

Papers are solicited on any aspect on the intersection of culture
and computing, but all papers are expected to be suitable for a
multidisciplinary audience. We have a single session Main Track
and a few parallel session Special Tracks. The Main Track will
present a collection of scientific or engineering research results.
Examples of suitable paper topics for the Main Track include:

-- Archiving cultural heritages
-- Information environments for humanity studies
-- Art and design by information technologies
-- Digital storytelling
-- Intercultural communication and collaboration
-- Culturally situated agents and simulations
-- Game and culture
-- Analysis of new culture in the Internet and Web
-- Culture and brain science

The Special Tracks are collections of short papers, and are
organized in coordination with the Main Track for the purpose of
encouraging discussions in hot areas. We have Special Tracks for
"Digital Humanities," "Asian Culture based Media Art" and
"Computing and Music" at this conference.

Paper

Submitted papers must report original work that has not been
previously published. A full paper with a limit of six (6) pages
and a special trackpaper with a limit of two (2) pages, should be
submitted by the paper submission deadline. Papers should follow
the formatting instructions for publishing with IEEE Computer
Society's Conference Publishing Services.

Main Track papers (full papers) should be submitted electronically
with an abstract (150 words) via EasyChair at
http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=3Dculture2011.
Submissions (PDF) must be written in English and must not exceed
6 pages in IEEE Standard template.

Special Track papers (short papers) should be submitted electronically
with an abstract (150 words) via EasyChair at
http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=3Dculture2011sp.
Submissions (PDF) must be written in English and must not exceed
2 pages in IEEE Standard template.

All submitted papers will be reviewed by three distinguished
researchers in the area of culture and computing. Accepted papers
will appear in the conference proceedings published by the IEEE
Computer Society and be included in the IEEE Computer Society
Digital Libraries (CSDL).

Important Dates

Main Track:
Deadline for titles and abstracts: April 20th, 2011
Deadline for papers for review: May 1st, 2011
Author notification: June 20th, 2011
Deadline for camera ready papers: July 20th, 2011

Special Track:
Deadline for titles and abstracts: May 20th, 2011
Deadline for papers for review: June 1st, 2011
Author notification: June 20th, 2011
Deadline for camera ready papers: July 20th, 2011



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2010 20:30:45 +0100
        From: Georg Vogeler <georg.vogeler at gmx.de>
        Subject: Spring school "Digital scholarly editing" Vienna, 14-18.3.2011

Dear colleagues,

the Institute for Documentology and Editorial Sciences
 http://www.i-d-e.de <http://www.i-d-e.de/ > wants to invite you to its
fourth school on digital scholarly editing. The “Spring School: Digital
Edition of Archival Documents and Manuscripts” will take place in
Vienna, 14.-18.3.2011 and is organized in cooperation with the
International Center for Archival Research <http://www.icar-us.eu
 http://www.icar-us.eu/ > and the Austrian National Library
 http://www.onb.ac.at/sammlungen/hschrift.htm . The course is held in
German. It is open to everybody working on a scholarly edition who wants
to integrate modern information technologies into his/her project. The
website of the school  http://www.i-d-e.de/spring-school-2011  gives you
further information on the scope and the preliminary program. Please
send your application including a short description of your critical
edition project to SpringSchool2011 at icar-us.eu.

Best

Georg Vogeler



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2010 20:32:09 +0100
        From: "Marlies Olensky" <marlies.olensky at ibi.hu-berlin.de>
        Subject: TPDL 2011 - Call for Proposals for Workshops, Tutorials, and Panels


CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

TPDL 2011 - International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital
Libraries (formerly known as ECDL)

Main conference: September 26-28, 2011
Tutorials, Workshops: September 25, 29, 2011
Venue: Erwin Schrödinger-Zentrum Adlershof, Berlin, Germany
Conference Website: http://www.tpdl2011.org
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TPDL2011
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TPDL2011
Linkedin:
http://events.linkedin.com/TPDL-2011-International-Conference/pub/504696
Xing:
http://www.xing.com/events/international-conference-theory-practice-digital-libraries-2011-633977
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

The call for proposals for workshops, tutorials and panels is now online
on our website:
http://www.tpdl2011.org

Important deadlines:
Workshop proposal submission: February 14, 2011
Tutorial proposal submission: February 14, 2011
Panel proposal submission: February 14, 2011
Notification of acceptance (workshop, tutorial, panel): March 14, 2011

Tentative deadlines:
Research paper submission: March 28, 2011
Poster and demo submission: March 28, 2011
Doctoral consortium submission: March 28, 2011
Notification of acceptance (research paper, poster, demo, doctoral
consortium): May 23, 2011
Submission of final version (research paper, poster, demo, panel,
tutorial, doctoral consortium abstract): June 6, 2011

The official call for papers will follow in the first week of January.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
General Chair
Stefan Gradmann, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Local Organising Chair
Marlies Olensky, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Programme Chairs
Carlo Meghini, ISTI-CNR, Italy
Heiko Schuldt, University of Basel, Switzerland



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2010 18:09:07 -0500
        From: Neil Fraistat <nfraistat at gmail.com>
        Subject: Open Annotation Collaboration


All,

The Open Annotation Collaboration (OAC) project is pleased to announce
an open call for statements of interest in participating in the Using
the OAC Model for Annotation Interoperability Workshop. The workshop
will be held 24-25 March 20011 in Chicago, IL and will provide an in-
depth introduction to the OAC data model and ontology for describing
scholarly annotations of Web-accessible information resources. Use
cases involving a range of scholarly annotation classes and target
media types will be presented. Participants will be asked to examine,
comment on, and provide feedback on how well the OAC data model and
framework intersects (or fails to intersect) with domain-specific
needs for scholarly annotation services and with existing discipline
or repository-specific annotation tools and services. By the end of
the day and a half workshop, attendees will be better prepared to
propose and undertake implementations of annotation tools and services
exploiting the OAC data model and ontology.

The workshop is planned for 9 AM March 24 through 1 PM March 25, 2011,
in Chicago, Illinois. Limited support is available to reimburse
invited participants for reasonable travel costs. Preliminary
statements of interest & use case briefs are due by January 24, 2011.
In the event of oversubscription, these briefs will be used to select
invitees; invitations will be issued by February 7. Please see
http://www.openannotation.org/documents/CallForWorkshopParticipation.pdf
for additional details and context; contact Tim Cole (t-
cole3 at illinois.edu) or Jacob Jett (jjett2 at illinois.edu) for further
information.

The Open Annotation Collaboration is supported by a grant from the
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. OAC members include the University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Maryland, the
University of Queensland (Australia), and the Los Alamos National
Laboratory.

Neil

-- 
Neil Fraistat
Professor of English & Director
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
University of Maryland
301-405-5896 or 301-314-7111 (fax)
http://www.mith.umd.edu/
http://twitter.com/ http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?et=1103625845082&s=12322&e=001yfPenvYFXAImE2O-MiN05n3DJT14laE37Cg4Ha7Xy9zssjCXh6AF0eXsRKh40bUYLTp_dEaPDws2-JefDzbhaCRRRb7eBkinaw-CsPlptdXNb3npVZxpV0tUsnFIJbTB 
fraistat



--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 20 Dec 2010 10:05:54 +0000
        From: Lennart Nacke <lennart.nacke at acm.org>
        Subject: 2nd CfP: Brain and Body Interfaces: Designing for Meaningful Interaction


We explicitly seek game and entertainment-related contributions for
this workshop. Please cross-post and disseminate widely. Deadline is
only 1 month away (Jan 14). Workshop is on May 8. We look forward to
your participation.

*********************************************************************
CHI 2011 WORKSHOP - BRAIN AND BODY INTERFACES:
DESIGNING FOR MEANINGFUL INTERACTION
*********************************************************************

WEBSITE: http://brainandbody.physiologicalcomputing.net

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION
*********************************************************************
The brain and body provide a wealth of information about the
physiological, cognitive and emotional state of the user. There is an
increasing opportunity to use physiological data as a form of input
control for computerised systems. As entry level sensors become more
cheaper and widespread, physiological interfaces are liable to become
more pervasive in our society (e.g., through mobile phones and similar
devices). While these signals offer new and exciting mechanisms for
the control of interactive systems, the issue of whether these
physiological interfaces are appropriate for application and offer the
user a meaningful level interaction has been relatively unexplored.

The goal of this one-day workshop is to bring together researchers
working on brain and body interactive systems in order to (1) provide
a platform for understanding physiological interaction in different
research strands, (2) establish a forum for the discussion of
technologies, techniques and measures, and (3) build and extend the
physiological computing community.

WORKSHOP SUBMISSIONS
*********************************************************************
We are inviting technical contributions on the following three topics:

1. An Application Approach to Sensor Design
#################################################
The design of a sensor at the hardware and software level defines the
type of application for which the device is suitable. In medical and
psychophysiological research, high-resolution data capture under
laboratory conditions is standard. However not every type of
physiological computer requires high-fidelity equipment and many of
these systems must work in the field. Perhaps the physiological
variable that drives the application must be captured with a degree of
sensitivity and robustness. The application domain defines the
requirements of the sensor and the type of hardware/software support
required.

In submitting under this topic, we ask researchers to consider how the
type of application influences the specification of measures and the
required specification for sensor design. For example, a heart rate
sensor combined with an accelerometer allows physical effort to be
removed from changes in heart rate, allowing cognitive and emotional
effects to be processed.

2. Meaningful Interactions with Physiology
#################################################
A physiological computing system can define the relationship between
the changes in a physiological signal and a system command in any
number of ways. However, certain relations between the physical and
virtual will be more intuitive if they can be made meaningful from the
perspective of the user (i.e., a natural interaction). For example,
increases and decreases in psychophysiological activation should lead
to changes that are both appropriate and intuitive at the interface.

In submitting under this topic, we ask researchers to consider what
defines a meaningful physiological interaction and what types of
meaningful interaction may exist across different categories of
physiological computing system (e.g. BCI, telemedicine, affective
computing). We also welcome contributions with regard to methods that
evaluate meaningful interaction within this context.

3. Ethics and Privacy
#################################################
Physiological data of users are a highly personalised and private
source of information. The storage and/or manipulation of these data
can pose certain ethical concerns. For example, the uploading of
physiological statistics to an online forum outside a medical context
may lead to unsubstantiated self-diagnosis.

In submitting under this topic, we ask researchers to consider the
ethics and privacy issues involved in the storage and/or manipulation
of a users physiology (e.g., in biocybernetic adaptive systems) and to
what extent should we allow the user’s state to be manipulated?

[...]



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