[Humanist] 24.589 Stormont Papers? imagery of computing?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Dec 15 07:21:53 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 589.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Knight, Gareth" <gareth.knight at kcl.ac.uk>                (15)
        Subject: Help us improve the Stormont Parliamentary Papers digital
                resource

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (22)
        Subject: an arresting sentence


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2010 13:37:50 +0000
        From: "Knight, Gareth" <gareth.knight at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Help us improve the Stormont Parliamentary Papers digital resource

** Apologies for cross-posting **

The JISC funded SPHERE project is collecting information on the use of the Stormont Parliamentary Papers digital resource - an archive of the House of Commons debates from the Stormont Government, 1921-72. A short web survey on use of the resource is available at the following web link

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/KQFWR9N

The information collected by the project will be used to understand the needs of the research and teaching community and establish priorities for the digitisation of new content and redevelopment of the user interface. Your contribution to the survey will establish current use of the Stormont Parlimentary Papers resource and help to shape its future development.

For further information on the SPHERE Project please visit:

http://sphere.cerch.kcl.ac.uk/
 
For further information on the Stormont Parliamentary Papers please visit:

http://stormontpapers.ahds.ac.uk/stormontpapers/index.html

Lorna Hughes
Deputy Director
Centre for e-Research
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 14 Dec 2010 20:37:17 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: an arresting sentence

Jonathan Benthall, concluding his discussion of the computer in art, in 
his book Science and Technology in Art Today (London: Thames & Hudson, 
1972), remarks thus on the difficulties artists of the time faced:

> It is as if the computer were some creature of great sexual
> attractiveness whose actual anatomy remains elusive, frigid and
> unexplored.  (p. 84)

Most computers in the early 1970s were kept behind closed doors, 
accessible at best across an input/output desk. They were hulking big 
things, noisy, tended by a priesthood (the term was common at the time) 
of white-labcoated technicians. So, yes, elusive, and literally frigid 
from the forced-air, under-floor refrigeration. Unexplored, too, because 
you couldn't get at them. But the intimacy of that respectful 
description tells another tale. What do you suppose it is?

Yours,
WM

-- 
Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
Professor, Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney,
www.uws.edu.au/centre_for_cultural_research/ccr/people/researchers;
Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.





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