[Humanist] 24.282 new publications: text & genre; visions, cartography &c

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Aug 24 23:26:47 CEST 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 282.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (45)
        Subject: new publication

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (57)
        Subject: GLIMPSE


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 24 Aug 2010 12:03:28 +1000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: new publication

Some here will appreciate knowing about the following new publication:

Willard McCarty, ed., Text and Genre in Reconstruction. Effects of 
Digitalization on Ideas, Behaviours, Products and Institutions. 
Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2010.

In this broad-reaching, multi-disciplinary collection, leading scholars 
investigate how the digital medium has altered the way we read and write 
text. In doing so, it challenges the very notion of scholarship as it 
has traditionally been imagined. Incorporating scientific, 
socio-historical, materialist and theoretical approaches, this rich body 
of work explores topics ranging from how computers have affected our 
relationship to language, whether the book has become an obsolete 
object, the nature of online journalism, and the psychology of 
authorship. The essays offer a significant contribution to the growing 
debate on how digitization is shaping our collective identity, for 
better or worse.

Text and Genre in Reconstruction will appeal to scholars in both the 
humanities and sciences and provides essential reading for anyone 
interested in the changing relationship between reader and text in the 
digital age.

Contents

Introduction, Willard McCarty
1. Never Say Always Again: Reflections on the Numbers Game, John Burrows
2. Cybertextuality by the Numbers, Ian Lancashire
3. Textual Pathology, Peter Garrard
4. The Human Presence in Digital Artefacts, Alan Galey
5. Defining Electronic Editions: A Historical and Functional 
Perspective, Edward Vanhoutte
6. Electronic Editions for Everyone, Peter Robinson
7. How Literary Works Exist: Implied, Represented, and Interpreted, 
Peter Shillingsburg
8. Text as Algorithm and as Process, Paul Eggert
9. ‘I Read the News Today, Oh Boy!’: Newspaper Publishing in the Online 
World, Marilyn Deegan and Kathryn Sutherland
References

No. of pages: 256

See http://tinyurl.com/Text-and-Genre for more.

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
Professor, Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western Sydney,
www.uws.edu.au/centre_for_cultural_research/ccr/people/researchers;
Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 24 Aug 2010 22:09:12 +1000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: GLIMPSE


Some here will be interested in the online and print publication, 
GLIMPSE: the art + science of seeing (www.glimpsejournal.com/). Note in 
particular the Autumn 2010 issue, Text, described thus:

> In Glimpse’s issue on "Text," we aim to present a discussion of the
> evolution of text, from its appearance in the earliest written
> languages to its contemporary forms and theoretical frameworks (i.e.
> text messages and semiotics). In addition, this issue will focus on
> the visual implications of text: from text in handwriting, typography
> and printmaking (examining the physical contours and formation of the
> letters themselves), to how we read and cognitively interpret written
> symbols.
>
> We welcome work from a range of disciplines that deal with text in a
> physical, cognitive and/or historical context. Contributors might
> explore how/why dyslexic brains "flip" letters, and conversely, how
> “normal” brains interpret text. We invite work that explores the many
> functions of text: as evidence, as identity, as ritual, as social
> interaction. We also encourage writers to investigate the revolutions
> in technology that changed the face of text, as in the cases of the
> printing press and hypertext.
>
> We invite works that cover any of these suggested topics, and also
> encourage submissions that approach relevant issues that are unlisted
> here. Submissions may not exceed 3000 words (or 6 pages for
> non-textual visual submissions). Research articles presented for the
> layperson, essays, interviews, book and film reviews, and visual
> spreads are all welcomed.

Winter 2011 promises Cartography, "on mapping systems, physical or 
imagined, on a micro- or macro-scale, that plot out our visible world or 
unperceived worlds in a linear or non-linear fashion".

The current issue, #6, summer 2010, Visions, has the following:

INVISIBLE FRIENDS: The creation of imaginary companions in childhood and beyond
Dr. Tracy Gleason, Associate Professor of Psychology, Wellesley College

THE SIMULATION OF THE GOD EXPERIENCE WITHIN THE LABORATORY
Dr. M.A. Persinger, Professor of Psychology, Laurentian University

VISION AND VISIONS IN PIERO DELLA FRANCESCA’S LEGEND OF THE TRUE CROSS
Dr. Robert Belton, Dean of the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies, University of British Columbia, Okanagan; and Dr. Bernd Kersten, Institut für Psychologie, Abteilung für Kognitionspsychologie, Universität Bern

TARA DESCRIBES A PHOTOGRAPH TO ME
Arto Vaun, GLIMPSE Staff Poet 

DECODING THE NEUROLOGICAL BASIS OF SHAMANIC VISIONS:
An interview with Dr. Michael Winkelman [web-only extended interview]
GLIMPSE's Carolyn Arcabascio

NEUTRAL TERRITORIES: The High Sierra - traveling inward
Peter Miles Bergman, Artist + Designer; Institute of Sociometry

RETROSPECT ca. 1870:
The temperance campaign against things that go bump in the night
Lauren B. Hewes, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Graphic Arts, American Antiquarian Society

OUR INSCAPES PROJECTED OUTWARD: Charles Bonnet Syndrome
GLIMPSE's Rachel Sapin

PERFORMING IMAGINARY PILGRIMAGES: Re/enacting the cloistered meta-voyages of the 15th-century Sisters of the Dominican Observance
[web-only supplementary music and images]
GLIMPSE's Carolyn Arcabascio

(Re)VIEWS: Requiem, Where the Wild Things Are & Harvey
Ivy Moylan, GLIMPSE Film Reviewer


Yours,
WM





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