[Humanist] 23.772 events

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Apr 24 09:18:19 CEST 2010


Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 772.
Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

[1]   From:    "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>        (23)
Subject: UCL Centre for Digital Humanities

[2]   From:    "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>        (24)
Subject: JISC event on modelling social interactions

[3]   From:    "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>        (37)
Subject: ESSLLI 2011

[4]   From:    "Sternfeld, Joshua" <JSternfeld at neh.gov>                   (4)
Subject: Deadline Correction: NEH Preservation and Access Research
andDevelopment is JULY 1, 2010

[5]   From:    Katherine L Walter <kwalter at unlnotes.unl.edu>             (44)
Subject: Nebraska Digital Workshop faculty and extension

[6]   From:    Barbara Bordalejo <b.bordalejo at BHAM.AC.UK>                (39)
Subject: Fwd: Text and Place: Abstracts and Programme

[7]   From:    Matthew Kirschenbaum <mkirschenbaum at gmail.com>            (54)
Subject: Two Ray Siemens Talks at Maryland Next Week

--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 11:26:43 +0100 (BST)
From: "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
Subject: UCL Centre for Digital Humanities

Please save the date!

Professor Malcolm Grant, UCL President and Provost and Dr Claire
Warwick, Director of the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities are
pleased to invite you to the launch of the UCL Centre for Digital
Humanities.

Guest speaker to be announced.
Evening Lecture and Reception.
Thursday 20th May 2010.
6.30pm registration, lecture starts at 7pm.
Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre, UCL, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT.

The UCL Centre for Digital Humanities is the hub of a network,
bringing together work being done in different departments and
research centres within UCL, as well as working closely with UCL
Library Services and Museums & Collections. The Centre is creating
connections beyond UCL, working with major archives, galleries,
libraries, museums, and members of the public to undertake research
that addresses important questions in the field of Digital
Humanities.

RSVP: http://launchuclcentrefordigtialhumanities.eventbrite.com/
For more details about the Centre visit: www.ucl.ac.uk/dh

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 11:28:39 +0100 (BST)
From: "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
Subject: JISC event on modelling social interactions

JISC Roadshow on:

Modelling social interactions and environments: advanced techniques
for the Arts and Social Sciences

This half-day workshop for researchers in the arts and social
sciences will highlight some of the opportunities now available
through the use of networks and advanced digital technologies for
research.

Sponsored by JISC, in collaboration with the training team at the
National e-Science Centre (NeSC), it is one of a series of roadshow
events for researchers and research support staff who are not
currently using e-research tools or e-infrastructure services but
would like to know how to get started. The roadshow, which is
coordinated by the Information Services Directorate, will provide an
interdisciplinary perspective illustrated by examples drawn mainly
from the computing and social sciences. Some of the practical
methods researchers can use for modelling real world social
situations will be presented.

University of East Anglia, Norwich
21 Apr 2010
09:30 - 14:00

For more information visit: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/uearoadshow

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 11:37:01 +0100 (BST)
From: "Willard McCarty" <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
Subject: ESSLLI 2011

23rd European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information
ESSLLI 2011
August 1-12, 2011
Ljubljana, Slovenia
Call for Course and Workshop Proposals
---------------------------------------------------------------------

The European Summer School in Logic, Language and Information
(ESSLLI) is organized every year by the Association for Logic,
Language and Information (FoLLI, http://www.folli.org/) in different
sites around Europe.  The main focus of ESSLLI is on the interface
between linguistics, logic and computer science.  ESSLLI offers
foundational, introductory and advanced courses, as well as
workshops, covering a wide variety of topics within or around the
three main areas of interest: Language and Computation, Language and
Logic, and Logic and Computation.  Previous summer schools have been
highly successful, attracting up to 500 students from Europe and
elsewhere.  The school has developed into an important meeting place
and forum for discussion for students and researchers interested in
the interdisciplinary study of Logic, Language and Information.  For
more information, visit the FoLLI website, as well as the ESSLLI
2010 website: http://esslli2010cph.info/.

CALL FOR COURSE AND WORKSHOP PROPOSALS

The ESSLLI 2011 Program Committee invites proposals for
foundational, introductory, and advanced courses, and for workshops
for the 23rd annual Summer School on important topics of active
research in the broad interdisciplinary area connecting logic,
linguistics, computer science and the cognitive sciences.

All proposals should be submitted, using a prescribed form that will
be available soon on the ESSLLI 2011 website, no later than:

June 14, 2010

Authors of proposals will be notified of the committee's decision by
September 15, 2010.

[...]

ESSLLI 2011 website: http://esslli2011.ijs.si/

--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 08:29:09 -0400
From: "Sternfeld, Joshua" <JSternfeld at neh.gov>
Subject: Deadline Correction: NEH Preservation and Access Research and Development is JULY 1, 2010

For clarification, the deadline for the NEH Preservation and Access
Research and Development program is JULY 1. Please make a note of this.
Our apologies for any confusion this may have caused.

--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 13:47:07 -0500
From: Katherine L Walter <kwalter at unlnotes.unl.edu>
Subject: Nebraska Digital Workshop faculty and extension

The Center for Digital Research in the Humanities (CDRH) at the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) is pleased to announce that the two senior faculty
for the 5th Nebraska Digital Workshop, Oct. 1-2, 2010,  are Professors Fotis
Jannidis and Stefan Tanaka. 

Dr. Fotis Jannidis is professor of German literature and literary computing
at the University of Wuerzburg, and is well known for his work on Goethe's
Faust: A Genetic Edition. 

Dr. Stefan Tanaka is professor of history, specializing in modern Japanese
history.  In particular, he is interested in the technologies of
communication and the ways that pasts have been formulated through various
media. 

The deadline for applications has been extended to May 7th.  We are seeking
proposals for digital presentations by pre-tenure faculty, post-doctoral
fellows, and advanced graduate students working in digital humanities. 

The goal of the Workshop is to enable the best early career scholars in the
field of digital humanities to present their work in a forum where it can be
critically evaluated, improved, and showcased.  Under the auspices of the
Center, the Workshop will bring nationally recognized senior scholars in
digital humanities to UNL to participate and work with the selected
scholars.  Selected early-career scholars will receive travel reimbursement
and an honorarium for presenting their work at the Nebraska Digital
Workshop. 

Selection criteria include:  significance in primary disciplinary field,
technical innovation, theoretical and methodological sophistication, and
creativity of approach. 

Please send an abstract, curriculum vitae, and a representative sample of
digital work via a URL or disk on or before May 7, 2010 to: Katherine L.
Walter, Co-Director, UNL Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, at
kwalter1 at unl.edu or 319 Love Library, UNL, Lincoln, NE 68588-4100 USA.

Thanks,

Kay Walter and Ken Price*****************************************
Katherine L. Walter and Kenneth M. Price
Co-Directors, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
Chair, Digital Initiatives & Special Collections Dept.
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
319 Love Library
Lincoln NE 68588-4100
voice: (402) 472-3939
kwalter1 at unl.edu
http://cdrh.unl.edu

--[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 18:49:37 +0100
From: Barbara Bordalejo <b.bordalejo at BHAM.AC.UK>
Subject: Fwd: Text and Place: Abstracts and Programme

FYI.

Begin forwarded message:

>
> From: Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
> [mailto:LCMRS at JISCMAIL.AC.UK] On Behalf Of Williams, Rebecca
> [ab0u4065]
> Sent: 23 April 2010 15:24
> To: LCMRS at JISCMAIL.AC.UK
> Subject: Text and Place: Abstracts and Programme
>
> ***APOLOGIES FOR CROSS-POSTING***
>
> Text and Place Conference, 27th May 2010, University of Liverpool
>
>
> Please find attached the abstracts and programme for Text and Place.
>
> A sandwich lunch can be provided at cost price. If you would like
> to order lunch, please let us know no later than Friday 21st May –
> payment will be taken on the day of the conference. If you have any
> dietary requirements, please make sure that you let us know when
> you order. (Please note that any who order lunch but do not attend
> will be invoiced for the cost.)
>
> Directions for the conference will follow. If you have any mobility
> requirements, please also let us know.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Becky Williams
>
> www.liv.ac.uk/cmrs/Text_And_Place.htm
>

--[7]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 21 Apr 2010 23:04:39 -0400
From: Matthew Kirschenbaum <mkirschenbaum at gmail.com>
Subject: Two Ray Siemens Talks at Maryland Next Week

Ray Siemens, Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing and
Professor of English at the University of Victoria--and all around
good fellow--will give two talks at the University of Maryland,
College Park next week. Both are free and open to the public--if
you're in the area, please consider coming to either or both. Please
also recirculate this announcement as appropriate.

Monday, April 26, "Foundations for a Future of the History of the
Book: Books, Bits, and INKE," at 3:00 in Tawes Hall (English
Department) room 3132.

What might the future of the book look like if a scholarly
understanding of its history were brought to bear on the science and
industry behind recent products like the Kindle and iPad? This talk
discusses the intellectual background and applied activities of the
Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) project, which hopes to
bring the best of an academic understanding of the history of the book
to our future engagement of it, via work encompassing a team of 35
researchers at 20 campuses and 21 separate research partners.

Tuesday, April 27, "Tool Mashing: The Devonshire MS (BL Add 17492) and
its Networks," at 12:30 at MITH in McKeldin Library.

Our interest in the Devonshire MS (BL Add 17492) for almost two
hundred years, now, has been in its role as a central textual witness
to the works of Thomas Wyatt, but the movement late last century
toward social theories of textuality and textual production has drawn
significant and new attention to the manuscript. It is now chiefly
seen as the product of a relatively large coterie situated in Queen
Anne Boleyn’s court at an exciting time in English history
(fictionalized grandly by the Tudors’ miniseries ;) , and quite
prominently as the first sustained example of men and women writing
together in the English tradition. Even so, what we now find to be
most unique and engaging about the document itself is difficult to
access, in part because of academic skills and context necessary
simply to read and understand it, but in larger part because the
connection between prominent identifiable figures and their
expressions in the manuscript — which amount in the best cases to
multi-voiced discussions and pontifications on matter important to the
authors and scribes of the manuscript — is difficult to sustain in any
meaningful way using traditional methods. This talk will represent the
work of a largish group at UVic who have been working on an edition of
the manuscript and, as part of this, have carried out an
experimentation in tool mashing / visualization to allow a more
coherent engagement of the connection between the people contributing
to the manuscript and the nature of the their exchanges and, via this,
to enable a significantly increased ability to understand the
interpersonal networks evident in the manuscript.

Contact Matthew Kirschenbaum for further details or information.

--
Matthew Kirschenbaum
Associate Professor of English
Associate Director, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
Director, Digital Cultures and Creativity (DCC, a new Living/Learning
Program in the Honors College)
University of Maryland
301-405-8505 or 301-314-7111 (fax)
http://mkirschenbaum.net




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