[Humanist] 23.4 new on WWW: TL Infobits for April

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu May 7 10:48:01 CEST 2009


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 4.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
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        Date: Wed, 6 May 2009 15:52:19 +0100
        From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas at email.unc.edu>
        Subject: TL Infobits -- April 2009


TL INFOBITS     April 2009              No. 34          ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

......................................................................

Technology and Lifelong Learning
Are Wikis on the Way Out?
Physical and Virtual Learning Spaces
Internet Literacy Handbook Updated
World Digital Library Launches
OECD Education Report
Disruptions and Breaking Points in Scholarly Publishing
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

TECHNOLOGY AND LIFELONG LEARNING

"Most learning does not take place in formal educational programmes.
Increasingly, technology is being used for learning -- both by young
people of school age and older people inside and outside work,
interacting with social networks -- and is greatly increasing in its
power to do so. Yet we remain largely inept at responding to this at
curriculum, pedagogical, administrative or financial levels. If this
situation remains, then formal education is likely to become less
relevant for the everyday lives and learning of many people. Of course,
lifelong learning will not cease to be, but may be increasingly
disconnected from the formal provision of education. However
unpredictable the longterm nature of technological change, lifelong
learning will be shaped by the increasing power and adaptability of the
Web and the applications that it supports."

"Technological Change, IFLL Thematic Paper 2," published by the Inquiry
into the Future for Lifelong Learning (IFLL), focuses on adult learning
in the United Kingdom. However, much of its observations and
conclusions are applicable, regardless of location:

"[I]ndividuals [are] becoming producers of learning content, initiating
        an un-owned and untethered 'curriculum cloud'."

"[L]earning through communities of interest [is] being self-defined
        rather than institutionally defined."

"[I]nformation and knowledge access [will] become increasingly
        unconstrained by having to make choices about where to go, what
        to take, or what to bring at any given time."

The report is available at
http://www.niace.org.uk/lifelonglearninginquiry/docs/IFLL-TechnologicalChange.pdf

The goal of the IFLL, established in 2007 and sponsored by the National
Institute of Adult and Continuing Education (NIACE), is to offer "an
authoritative and coherent strategic framework for lifelong learning in
the UK." NIACE, founded in 1921, is "the main advocacy body for adult
learning in England and Wales and probably the largest body devoted to
adult education in the world." For more information, contact: NIACE, 20
Princess Road West, Leicester, LE1 6TP, UK; tel:+44 (0)116 204
4200/4201; fax: +44 (0)116 285 4514; email: enquiries at niace.org.uk;
Web: http://www.niace.org.uk/

......................................................................

ARE WIKIS ON THE WAY OUT?

"Have wikis lost their mojo? Were they before their (Internet) time? Or
have they been co-opted by the newer, shinier social networks?"

In "Whither Wikis? The State of Collaborative Web Publishing" (LINUX
INSIDER, April 29, 2009) Renay San Miguel asks if the usefulness of
wikis has run its course. He speculates that the tool is too "nerdy,"
takes too much work, and requires too much oversight. The article is
available at
http://www.linuxinsider.com/story/Whither-Wikis-The-State-of-Collaborative-Web-Publishing-66927.html

----

In response to San Miguel's argument, THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION
asked the question "Have Wikis Run Out of Steam?" (April 30, 2009;
http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/article/3744/have-wikis-run-out-of-steam?).
The resulting reader comments indicate that many college and university
Instructors still continue to find wikis beneficial for their courses
and students.

......................................................................

PHYSICAL AND VIRTUAL LEARNING SPACES

The first online-only edition of EDUCAUSE QUARTERLY (EQ)is devoted to
learning spaces, both physical and virtual. Articles covering Internet
tools in learning spaces include:

"Virtual World Learning Spaces: Developing a Second Life Operating Room
        Simulation" by Stephanie Gerald and David M. Antonacci

"'Where Do You Learn?': Tweeting to Inform Learning Space Development"
        by Elizabeth J. Aspden and Louise P. Thorpe

The entire issue is available at http://www.educause.edu/eq/

The March/April 2009 issue of EDUCAUSE REVIEW
(http://www.educause.edu/er/) provides a complement to EQ by focusing
on the same theme.

EDUCAUSE Quarterly [ISSN 1528-5324] is "an online, peer-reviewed,
practitioner's journal from EDUCAUSE about managing and using
information resources in higher education." Articles from current and
back issues are available at http://www.educause.edu/pub/eq/

EDUCAUSE Review [ISSN 1527-6619], a bimonthly print magazine that
explores developments in information technology and education, is also
published by EDUCAUSE. Articles from current and back issues are
available at http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher
education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology.
The current membership comprises more than 1,900 colleges,
universities, and educational organizations, including 200
corporations, with 15,000 active members. EDUCAUSE has offices in
Boulder, CO, and Washington, DC. Learn more about EDUCAUSE at
http://www.educause.edu/

......................................................................

INTERNET LITERACY HANDBOOK UPDATED

THE INTERNET LITERACY HANDBOOK, compiled by Janice Richardson et al.,
was updated in December 2008. This third edition, aimed at parents,
teachers, and students, contains a collection of Fact Sheets that
provide brief, basic introductory explanations for a variety of
Internet tools such as portals, email, social networks, and blogs. The
Handbook is available at no cost online in HTML, Flash, or RTF formats,
or it can be purchased in a hardcopy version. To access the Handbook go
to
http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/standardsetting/internetliteracy/hbk_EN.asp

The Handbook is published by the Council of Europe, an organization of
47 member countries working to "promote awareness and encourage the
development of Europe's cultural identity and diversity." For more
information, contact: Council of Europe, Avenue de l'Europe, 67075
Strasbourg Cedex, France; tel: +33 (0)3 88 41 20 00; email:
infopoint at coe.int; Web: http://www.coe.int/

......................................................................

WORLD DIGITAL LIBRARY LAUNCHES

On April 21, 2009, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and
Cultural Organization (UNESCO) opened the World Digital Library (WDL).
The Library's mission is to make "available on the Internet, free of
charge and in multilingual format, significant primary materials from
countries and cultures around the world" for the use of educators,
scholars, and the general public. The initial collection includes about
1,200 documents and their explanations from scholars in Arabic,
Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian. To explore
the WDL, go to http://www.wdl.org/

......................................................................

OECD EDUCATION REPORT

In March 2009, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD) released the report "Education Today: The OECD
Perspective." Based on OECD work since 2002, the report's content
ranges from "student performance to educational spending and equity in
education" and covers educational levels from early childhood through
higher education and adult education.

You can access the Handbook at
http://www.oecd.org/document/57/0,3343,en_2649_33723_42440761_1_1_1_1,00.html

The OECD, established in 1961, is an international organization that
represents 30 member countries and collects economic and social data,
monitors trends, analyzes and forecasts economic developments, and
researches social changes or evolving patterns in trade, environment,
agriculture, technology, taxation and more. For more information,
contact: OECD, 2 rue Andre Pascal, F-75775 Paris Cedex 16, France; tel:
+33 1.45.24.82.00; fax: +33 1.45.24.85.00; Web: http://www.oecd.org/

......................................................................

DISRUPTIONS AND BREAKING POINTS IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING

"Far from being a neutral conduit for knowledge, the publication system
defines the social processes through which knowledge is made, and gives
tangible form to knowledge."

In "Signs of Epistemic Disruption: Transformations in the Knowledge
System of the Academic Journal" (FIRST MONDAY, vol. 14, no. 4-6, April
2009), Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis provide an overview of the current
state of scholarly journals and go on to discuss some of the
"disruptive forces" and breaking points that are changing the scholarly
journal. Some of these breaking points include

        -- the unsustainable costs and inefficiencies of traditional
        commercial publishing

        -- the credibility and accountability of the peer review system

        -- the flawed system of post-publication evaluation and impact
        analysis

The paper is available at
http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2309/2163

First Monday [ISSN 1396-0466] is an online, peer-reviewed journal whose
aim is to publish original articles about the Internet and the global
information infrastructure. It is published in cooperation with the
University Library, University of Illinois at Chicago. For more
information, contact: First Monday, c/o Edward Valauskas, Chief Editor,
PO Box 87636, Chicago IL 60680-0636 USA; email: ejv at uic.edu; Web:
http://firstmonday.org/

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas at unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

"What Is Not Available Online Is Not Worth Reading?"
By Hamid R. Jamali
WEBOLOGY, vol. 5, no. 4, December 2008
http://www.webology.ir/2008/v5n4/a63.html

"Based on a study of physicists and astronomers, this article shows
that more scientists now assume that if articles are of enough quality
and significance, they must be available online and vice versa. Though
still in a low minority, a number of scientists believe that what is
not available online is not worth the effort to obtain it."

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