[Humanist] 23.94 programming; language; mss in TEI

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Jun 19 08:54:29 CEST 2009


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 94.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Sterling Fluharty <phdinhistory at gmail.com>                (16)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.83 on language

  [2]   From:    Devin Griffiths <devin.griffiths at rutgers.edu>             (17)
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] mss edn in TEI?

  [3]   From:    Michael Fraser <mike.fraser at oucs.ox.ac.uk>                (27)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.85 programming for poets


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2009 09:22:30 -0600
        From: Sterling Fluharty <phdinhistory at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.83 on language
        In-Reply-To: <20090617082411.798711DC5B at woodward.joyent.us>

Interesting, but definitely science fiction.  Linguists tell me that  
typical human speech never sounds out of tune to a speaker of the same  
language.

Sterling Fluharty

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 17, 2009, at 2:24 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk 
 > wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 83.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2009 09:23:13 +0100
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2009 09:56:03 -0500
        From: Devin Griffiths <devin.griffiths at rutgers.edu>
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] mss edn in TEI?
        In-Reply-To: <20090617082411.798711DC5B at woodward.joyent.us>

Off the top of my head, here are a few that are influential here in the
states:

The Women Writer's Project 
http://www.wwp.brown.edu/

The Dickinson Electronic Archives 
http://www.emilydickinson.org/index.html

The MONK Project 
http://www.monkproject.org/

Hope that helps.

Sincerely,
Devin Griffiths


--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 18 Jun 2009 19:22:06 +0100
        From: Michael Fraser <mike.fraser at oucs.ox.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.85 programming for poets
        In-Reply-To: <20090618040455.0F0971B26B at woodward.joyent.us>

Were I looking for such a course I would wish it to teach me how to
write software code enwrapped in poetic form. How to communicate,
through my code, beauty, rhythm, metre and a meaning deeper than the
superficially functional.

A quick google search finds
 http://www.cs.waikato.ac.nz/studentacm/codepoetry07/  (though alas the
code was not required to
have any functional purpose) and
 http://java.sun.com/features/2002/11/gabriel_qa.html , for example.

I have seen single lines of perl with almost haiku-like properties in
its elegance and concision. But poetic code is not just about form and
structure, it's also about the imagery, emotion, and ambiguity conveyed
in the choice of expressions even if the intended function is perfectly
clear. Of course, most users never see the code, simply executing the
compiled binary, so please also consider the implied reader of such poetry.

All that source code in repositories like Sourceforge -- surely there
are examples there of already 'found poetry'?

Mike
--
Dr Michael Fraser
Head of Infrastructure Systems and Services
Oxford University Computing Services
13 Banbury Road
Oxford OX2 6NN
Tel: 01865 283 343
Fax: 01865 273 275
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~mikef/





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