[Humanist] 23.71 new on WWW: TL Infobits for May

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jun 6 17:30:24 CEST 2009


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 71.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 5 Jun 2009 19:58:48 +0100
        From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas at email.unc.edu>
        Subject: TL Infobits -- May 2009


TL INFOBITS     May 2009                No. 35          ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue and all back issues at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/

......................................................................

Are Lower Grades Linked to Facebook Use?
Learning in Virtual Worlds
IP Policies and E-Learning
New Journal on Higher Ed Information Literacy
New Journal on Digital Culture
Helping Computer-Literate Students Become Research-Literate
Two Views of Online Instruction
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

ARE LOWER GRADES LINKED TO FACEBOOK USE?

When doctoral student Aryn Karpinski's unpublished study connecting
students' heavy Facebook use and lower grades was presented at the
annual meeting of the American Education Research Association in April
it created a "media sensation" both in the press and among academic
blogs. Not everyone found her conclusions convincing.

Three researchers attempted to replicate Karpinski's findings using
three datasets: (1) a large sample of undergraduate students from the
University of Illinois at Chicago, (2) a nationally representative
cross sectional sample of American 14– to 22–year–olds, and (3) a
longitudinal panel of American youth aged 14–23. They report (in
"Facebook and Academic Performance: Reconciling a Media Sensation with
Data," by Josh Pasek, Eian More, and Eszter Hargittai, FIRST MONDAY,
vol. 14, no. 5, May 4, 2009) that "[i]n none of the samples do we find
a robust negative relationship between Facebook use and grades. Indeed,
if anything, Facebook use is more common among individuals with higher
grades."

The article is available at
http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2498/2181

First Monday [ISSN 1396-0466] is an online, peer-reviewed journal whose
aim is to publish original articles about the Internet and the global
information infrastructure. It is published in cooperation with the
University Library, University of Illinois at Chicago. For more
information, contact: First Monday, c/o Edward Valauskas, Chief Editor,
PO Box 87636, Chicago IL 60680-0636 USA; email: ejv at uic.edu; Web:
http://firstmonday.org/

See also:

"Study Finds Link between Facebook Use, Lower Grades in College"
http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2009/05/facebook.html

Poster of Karpinski's study
http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/facebook2009.jpg

......................................................................

LEARNING IN VIRTUAL WORLDS

"Virtual worlds as educational spaces--with their three-dimensional
landscapes and customizable avatars--seem so similar to video games
that educators may assume . . . that students will become as motivated
by virtual worlds as they are by video games. However, these same
similarities may also lead students to perceive virtual worlds as play
spaces rather than as innovative educational environments. If students
feel that learning opportunities offered in such spaces are not valid,
they are likely to feel that they are not learning."

        -- Catheryn Cheal, "Student Perceptions of a Course Taught in
        Second Life"

The June/July 2009 issue of INNOVATE (vol. 5, issue 5) focuses on the
theme of virtual worlds and simulations in education. The papers
reflect the maturing of the study of virtuality in education that grew
out of early discussions and the formation of the League of Worlds, a
conference whose mission is to "stimulate and disseminate research,
analysis, theory, technical and curricular developments in the
creative, educational, training-based and social use of role-playing,
simulations and virtual worlds."

The journal is available http://innovateonline.info/
Registration is required to access articles; registration is free.

Innovate: Journal of Online Education [ISSN 1552-3233], an open-access,
peer-reviewed online journal, is published bimonthly by the Fischler
School of Education and Human Services at Nova Southeastern University.
The journal focuses on the creative use of information technology (IT)
to enhance educational processes in academic, commercial, and
governmental settings. For more information, contact James L. Morrison,
Editor-in-Chief; email: innovate at nova.edu; Web:
http://innovateonline.info/

For more information about the League of Worlds, go to
http://www.ubiqlab.org/low/

......................................................................

IP POLICIES AND E-LEARNING

"When we contrast the face-to-face learning environment with the online
(e-learning) environment, nearly all assumptions about IP [intellectual
property] and copyright are called into question. Virtually all
materials that contribute to e-learning are (or can be) digitized,
retained, archived, attributed and logged. This single fact raises
questions about IP [intellectual property] ownership, responsibility,
policies, and procedures that are newly on the table."

In "Intellectual Property Policies, E-Learning, and Web 2.0:
Intersections and Open Questions" (ECAR Research Bulletin, vol. 2009,
issue 7, April 7, 2009), Veronica Diaz discusses how online learning
has necessitated revising IP policies that were created for
face-to-face instructional settings. She notes that higher education IP
policies need to go beyond the assumption that "e-learning is contained
within an institutional system" as Web 2.0 technologies and social
networking expand the reach of the learning environment.

The report is available online to members of ECAR subscribing
institutions at
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ecar_so/erb/ERB0907.pdf To find
out if your institution is a subscriber, go to
http://www.educause.edu/ECARSubscribingOrganizations/957

ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) "provides timely research
and analysis to help higher education leaders make better decisions
about information technology. ECAR assembles leading scholars,
practitioners, researchers, and analysts to focus on issues of critical
importance to higher education, many of which carry increasingly
complicated and consequential implications." For more information go to
http://www.educause.edu/content.asp?SECTION_ID=4

......................................................................

NEW JOURNAL COVERS HIGHER ED INFORMATION LITERACY

The NORDIC JOURNAL OF INFORMATION LITERACY IN HIGHER EDUCATION,
published by the University of Bergen, is a peer-reviewed, open-access
journal created to encourage "research-based development of information
literacy teaching within the educational programmes of universities and
higher education colleges" and to establish "a forum for the
investigation and discussion of connections between information
literacy and general learning processes within subject-specific
contexts."

Papers in the inaugural issue include:

"A New Conception of Information Literacy for the Digital Environment
        in Higher Education" by Sharon Markless

To provide an information literacy (IL) framework for a virtual
learning environment, the author considered the "relevant principles of
learning, the place of student reflection when learning to be
information literate, what IL in higher education (HE) should
encompass, the importance of context in developing IL, and the
influence of the digital environment, especially Web 2.0."

"Google Scholar compared to Web of Science. A Literature Review" by
        Susanne Mikki

According to the author, "Google Scholar is popular among faculty staff
and students, but has been met with scepticism by library professionals
and therefore not yet established as subject for teaching." In her
paper, Mikki makes a case for including Google Scholar as a library
resource by comparing it favorably with the more-highly-regarded Web of
Science database.

The journal is available at https://noril.uib.no/index.php/noril
Nordic Journal of Information Literacy in Higher Education (NORIL)
[ISSN 1890-5900] is published biannually by the University of Bergen
Library. For more information, contact: Anne Sissel Vedvik Tonning,
University of Bergen Library, Psychology, Education and Health Library,
PO Box 7808, N-5020 Bergen, Norway; tel: +47 55588621; fax: +47
55884740; email: anne.tonning at ub.uib.no; Web:
https://noril.uib.no/index.php/noril

......................................................................

NEW JOURNAL ON DIGITAL CULTURE

DIGITAL CULTURE & EDUCATION is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal
devoted to analyzing the "impact of digital culture on identity,
education, art, society, culture and narrative within social,
political, economic, cultural and historical contexts." Readers can
interact with the authors by posting online comments on the journal's
website. Paper submissions can include scholarly reviews of books,
conferences, exhibits, games, software, and hardware.

Papers in the first issue include:

"Revisiting Violent Videogames Research: Game Studies Perspectives on
        Aggression, Violence, Immersion, Interaction, and Textual
        Analysis" by Kyle Kontour, University of Colorado at Boulder

"Look at Me! Look at Me! Self-representation and Self-exposure through
        Online Networks" by Kerry Mallan, Queensland University of
        Technology

"Playing at Bullying: The Postmodern Ethic of Bully (Canis Canem Edit)"
        by Clare Bradford, Deakin University

Digital Culture & Education (DCE) [ISSN 1836-8301] is published as an
ongoing journal with content added to the journal's website as papers
are accepted. For more information, contact: Christopher Walsh, Editor;
email: editor at digitalcultureandeducation.com; Web:
http://www.digitalcultureandeducation.com/

......................................................................

HELPING COMPUTER-LITERATE STUDENTS BECOME RESEARCH-LITERATE

"While college students may be computer-literate, they are not, as a
rule, research-literate. And there's a huge difference between the
two."

In "Not Enough Time in the Library" (THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION,
May 14, 2009), Todd Gilman, librarian for literature in English at Yale
University's Sterling Memorial Library, offers faculty suggestions for
partnering with their campus library staff to help their students
become research-literate learners.

Some of his tips include:

-- have a librarian conduct a session on effective search strategies
        that help students "avoid frustration and wasted time."

-- provide an assignment that applies what the students have learned in
        the session, one that will "incorporate a component that
        challenges students to evaluate the quality of information they
        find."

-- schedule library tour that takes students beyond the study areas and
        into the reference and stack areas

The article is available at
http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2009/05/2009051401c.htm?utm_source=pm&utm_medium=en
(Online access may require a subscription to the Chronicle.)

The Chronicle of Higher Education [ISSN 0009-5982] is published weekly
by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc., 1255 Twenty-third Street,
NW, Washington, DC 20037 USA; tel: 202-466-1000; fax: 202-452-1033;
Web: http://chronicle.com/

......................................................................

TWO VIEWS OF ONLINE INSTRUCTION

"The Excellent Inevitability of Online Courses"
By Margaret Brooks
THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION May 29, 2009
http://chronicle.com/free/v55/i38/38a06401.htm?utm_source=pm&utm_medium=en

"Within our lifetimes, technology has fundamentally changed the way we
get the news, make purchases, and communicate with others. The Internet
provides a platform for learning about and interacting with the world.
It should be no surprise that students line up for courses that make
the best use of technologies that are so integral to their lives. It's
not just the economy. It's not just the convenience. It's the
integration of technology within society that's driving the development
of online courses."

"I'll Never Do It Again"
By Elayne Clift
THE CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 29, 2009
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v55/i38/38a03302.htm?utm_source=cr&utm_medium=en

"I trained for it, I tried it, and I'll never do it again. While online
teaching may be the wave of the future (although I desperately hope
not), it is not for me. Perhaps I'm the old dog that resists new
tricks. Maybe I am a technophobe. It might be that I'm plain
old-fashioned. This much I can say with certainty: I have years of
experience successfully teaching in collegiate classrooms, and online
teaching doesn't compare."

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas at unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

"How People are using Twitter during Conferences"
By Wolfgang Reinhardt, et al.
http://lamp.tu-graz.ac.at/~i203/ebner/publication/09_edumedia.pdf

(Draft version. Originally published in: CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION
COMPETENCIES ON THE WEB, Hornung-Prahauser, V., and M. Luckmann, (Ed.),
pp. 145-56.)

"Microblogging at conferences seems to be an additional way of
discussing presented topics and exchanging additional information. It
is not limited to the face-to-face audience or the location of the
conference. Microblogging rather allows virtually anyone to actively
participate in the thematic debates."

......................................................................

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