[Humanist] 23.123 new on WWW: TL Infobits for June

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jul 2 09:34:13 CEST 2009


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 123.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Wed, 1 Jul 2009 22:29:03 +0100
        From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas at email.unc.edu>
        Subject: TL Infobits -- June 2009


TL INFOBITS     June 2009               No. 36          ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue and all back issues at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/

......................................................................

Educating the Net Generation
Student Computer Skills: Perception and Reality
New Online Journal on Instruction
Critique of E-Learning in Blackboard
Google Book Search Bibliography
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

EDUCATING THE NET GENERATION

"A number of authors have argued that students who are entering the
higher education system have grown up in a digital culture that has
fundamentally influenced their preferences and skills in a number of
key areas related to education. It has also been proposed that today's
university staff are ill equipped to educate this new generation of
learners -- the Net Generation –- whose sophisticated use of emerging
technologies is incompatible with current teaching practice."

EDUCATING THE NET GENERATION: A HANDBOOK OF FINDINGS FOR PRACTICE AND
POLICY (Australian Learning and Teaching Council, 2009, ISBN:
9780734040732) reports on a collaborative project that began in 2006,
between staff at the University of Melbourne, the University of
Wollongong, and Charles Sturt University. Some of the findings of the
study included:

        "The rhetoric that university students are Digital Natives and
        university staff are Digital Immigrants is not supported."

        "[E]ven though young people's access to and use of computers
        and some information and communications technologies is high,
        they don't necessarily want or expect to use these technologies
        to support some activities, including learning."

        "The use of publishing and information sharing tools, such as
        wikis, blogs and photo sharing sites, positively impacted on
        many students' engagement with the subject material, their
        peers and the general learning community."

        "[M]any Web 2.0 technologies enable students to publicly
        publish and share content in forums hosted outside their
        university's infrastructure. This raises complex questions
        about academic integrity including issues of authorship,
        ownership, attribution and acknowledgement."
The handbook is available at http://www.netgen.unimelb.edu.au/

The Australian Learning and Teaching Council works with 44 Australian
higher education institutions "as a collaborative and supportive
partner in change, providing access to a network of knowledge, ideas
and people." For more information, contact: Australian Learning and
Teaching Council, 4-12 Buckland St., Chippendale, Sydney NSW 2008
Australia; tel: 02 8667 8500; fax: 02 8667 8515; email
info at altc.edu.au; Web: http://www.altc.edu.au/

......................................................................

STUDENT COMPUTER SKILLS: PERCEPTION AND REALITY

"The ubiquitous use of computers in homes and schools has aided the
perception that more students are computer literate than past
generations. There is a potential 'perfect storm' manifesting between
students' perceived proficiency of computer application skills and the
actual assessment of those skills."

By administering survey and assessment instruments to over 200 business
school students, researchers Donna M. Grant, Alisha D. Malloy, and
Marianne C. Murphy compared students' perceived proficiencies in three
computer skills areas -- word processing, presentation graphics, and
spreadsheets -- with their demonstrated skills. Their research results
showed "some differences in the students' perception of their word
processing skills and actual performance, no difference in perception
and performance for their presentation skills, and a significant
difference in perception and performance for their spreadsheet skills.
The study led to a redesign of an introductory business school course
to remedy students' deficiencies.

The paper, "A Comparison of Student Perceptions of their Computer
Skills to their Actual Abilities" (JITE, vol. 8, 2009, pp. 141-60), is
available at http://jite.org/documents/Vol8/JITEv8p141-160Grant428.pdf
The peer-reviewed Journal of Information Technology Education (JITE)
[ISSN 1539-3585 (online) 1547-9714 (print)] is published in print by
subscription and online free of charge by the Informing Science
Institute. For more information contact: Informing Science Institute,
131 Brookhill Court, Santa Rosa, California 95409 USA; tel:
707-531-4925; fax: 480-247-5724; Web: http://informingscience.org/
[Editor's note: At the time this article was written, the JITE website
and this paper were accessible; at the time of this mailing, they are
not. I have notified the JITE webmaster of the problem in the hope that
the site will soon be back online.]

......................................................................

NEW ONLINE JOURNAL ON INSTRUCTION

The first issue of the online peer-reviewed JOURNAL OF INSTRUCTIONAL
PEDAGOGIES [ISSN: 1941-3394], published by the Academic and Business
Research Institute, is available at http://aabri.com/jip.html

Papers in this issue that are related to instructional technology and
e-learning include:

"Student Perceptions of How Technology Impacts the Quality of
        Instruction and Learning" by Thomas Davies, et al.

"The Effects of Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and System
        Satisfaction Regarding Learner's Performance in E-Learning
        Environment" by Jong-Ki Lee

"Student Performance in Online Quizzes as a Function of Time in
        Undergraduate Financial Management Courses" by Oliver
        Schnusenberg

"Student Satisfaction in Web-enhanced Learning Environments" by Charles
        Hermans, et al.

The Academic and Business Research Institute supports the research and
publication needs of business and education faculty. For more
information about the journal, contact: Raymond Papp, Editor; email:
jip at aabri.com

......................................................................

CRITIQUE OF E-LEARNING IN BLACKBOARD

"Just as utopic visions of the Internet predicted an egalitarian online
world where information flowed freely and power became irrelevant, so
did many proponents of online education, who viewed online classrooms
as a way to free students and instructors from traditional power
relationships . . ."

In "A Critical Examination of Blackboard's E–Learning Environment"
(FIRST MONDAY, vol. 14, no. 6, June 1, 2009), Stephanie J. Coopman,
professor at San Jose State University, identifies the ways that the
Blackboard 8.0 and Blackboard CE6 platforms "both constrain and
facilitate instructor–student and student–student interaction." She
argues that while the systems have improved the instructor's ability to
track and measure student activity, this "creates a dangerously
decontextualized, essentialized image of a class in which levels of
'participation' stand in for evidence of learning having taken place.
Students are treated not as learners, as partners in an educational
enterprise, but as users."

The paper is available at
http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2434/2202

First Monday [ISSN 1396-0466] is an online, peer-reviewed journal whose
aim is to publish original articles about the Internet and the global
information infrastructure. It is published in cooperation with the
University Library, University of Illinois at Chicago. For more
information, contact: First Monday, c/o Edward Valauskas, Chief Editor,
PO Box 87636, Chicago IL 60680-0636 USA; email: ejv at uic.edu; Web:
http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/

......................................................................

GOOGLE BOOK SEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. has just published the 4th version of the
"Google Book Search Bibliography." "It primarily focuses on the
evolution of Google Book Search and the legal, library, and social
issues associated with it. Where possible, links are provided to works
that are freely available on the Internet, including e-prints in
disciplinary archives and institutional repositories." The bibliography
is available at http://www.digital-scholarship.org/gbsb/gbsb.htm

Links to Bailey's other extensive publications, including "Scholarly
Electronic Publishing Bibliography" and the "Open Access Webliography,"
are available at http://www.digital-scholarship.org/

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas at unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

OASIS: Open Access Scholarly Information Sourcebook
By Alma Swan and Leslie Chan
http://www.openoasis.org/

"OASIS aims to provide an authoritative 'sourcebook' on Open Access,
covering the concept, principles, advantages, approaches and means to
achieving it. The site highlights developments and initiatives from
around the world, with links to diverse additional resources and case
studies."




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