[Humanist] 23.239 new on WWW: Ubiquity on virtualization

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Aug 20 06:28:51 CEST 2009


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 239.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
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        Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2009 21:53:47 +0100
        From: ubiquity <ubiquity at HQ.ACM.ORG>
        Subject: UBIQUITY - NEW ISSUE ALERT


This Week in Ubiquity:
August 17-23, 09

Virtualizing the Datacenter Without Compromising Server Performance http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/volume_10/v10i9_kamoun.html
By Faouzi Kamoun

Virtualization has become a hot topic. Cloud computing is the latest and most prominent application of this time-honored idea, which is almost as old as the computing field itself. The term "cloud" seems to have originated with someone's drawing of the Internet as a puffy cloud hiding many servers and connections. A user can receive a service from the cloud without ever knowing which machine (or machines) rendered the service, where it was located, or how many redundant copies of its data there are. The cloud realizes the old dream of a computer utility, first articulated at MIT in the early 1960s.

One of the big concerns about the cloud is that it may assign many computational processes to one machine, thereby making that machine a bottleneck and giving poor response time. Faouzi Kamoun addresses this concern head on, and assures us that in most cases the virtualization used in the cloud and elsewhere improves performance. He also addresses a misconception made prominent in a Dilbert cartoon, when the boss said he wanted to virtualize the servers so as to save electricity.

Peter Denning
Editor

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Ubiquity welcomes the submissions of articles from everyone interested in the future of information technology.
Everything published in Ubiquity is copyrighted (c)2009 by the ACM and the individual authors.

To submit feedback about ACM Ubiquity, contact ubiquity at acm.org<mailto:ubiquity at acm.org>.





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