[Humanist] 23.218 new on WWW: Ubiquity; TL Infobits

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Aug 5 07:26:12 CEST 2009


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 218.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
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  [1]   From:    ubiquity <ubiquity at HQ.ACM.ORG>                            (14)
        Subject: UBIQUITY - NEW ISSUE ALERT

  [2]   From:    Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas at email.unc.edu>                    (180)
        Subject: TL Infobits -- July 2009


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Aug 2009 17:27:44 +0100
        From: ubiquity <ubiquity at HQ.ACM.ORG>
        Subject: UBIQUITY - NEW ISSUE ALERT


This Week in Ubiquity:
August 4 - 10, 2009

In Search of the Real Network Science: An Interview with David Alderson http://www.acm.org/ubiquity

Since Duncan Watts and Steve Strogatz published "Collective Dynamics of Small-World Networks" in Nature in 1998, there has been an explosion of interest in mathematical models of large networks, leading to numerous research papers and books. These works have given us new measures of large networks including hub nodes, broker nodes, connection path length, small-world phenomena, six degrees of separation, power laws of connectivity, and scale-free networks. The National Research Council carried out a study evaluating the emergence of a new area called "network science", which could provide the mathematics and experimental methods for characterizing, predicting, and designing networks.

The new area has its share of controversies. An example is whether the power law distribution of number of nodes of given connectivity leads to valid conclusions for real networks. The power law distribution predicts that the network will have hubs - a few nodes with high connectivity - and has led to the claim that such networks are vulnerable to attacks against the hubs. The Internet has been reported to follow power law connectivity but its design resists hub failures. How might we explain this anomaly?

David Alderson has become a leading advocate for formulating the foundations of network science so that its predictions can be applied to real networks. We interviewed him to find out what is going on.

Peter Denning
Editor

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ubiquity welcomes the submissions of articles from everyone interested in the future of information technology.
Everything published in Ubiquity is copyrighted (c)2009 by the ACM and the individual authors.

To submit feedback about ACM Ubiquity, contact ubiquity at acm.org<mailto:ubiquity at acm.org>.

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--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 4 Aug 2009 19:48:30 +0100
        From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas at email.unc.edu>
        Subject: TL Infobits -- July 2009


        TL INFOBITS     July 2009               No. 37          ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue and all back issues at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/

......................................................................

Are Online Students More Likely to Drop Out?
College Students in 2020
Cellphones as Instructional Tools
Ten Higher Education IT Issues for 2009
Being There for Online Students
Insights from Learning Leaders
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

ARE ONLINE STUDENTS MORE LIKELY TO DROP OUT?

"The accelerated growth of online instruction has been accompanied by
questions of quality in terms of outcomes. One measure of program
quality and effectiveness is program completion rates. Although studies
have shown the effectiveness of instruction in the online environment
to be comparable to that of the traditional classroom environment,
studies and anecdotal evidence indicate high attrition rates for online
courses, often much higher than for campus courses."

In "Attrition in Online and Campus Degree Programs" (OJDLA, vol. 12,
no. 2, Summer 2009), East Carolina University researchers Belinda
Patterson and Cheryl McFadden report on their study comparing online
and face-to-face students in two graduate-level programs. The
authors concluded that "attrition in online program formats remains an
issue and challenge warranting the attention of educational leaders in
program planning and development." They also believe that "[d]ropout
seems to result from an interaction of many complex variables that are
difficult to delineate and determine, particularly in online
environments, hence making it difficult for one comprehensive theory of
dropout to fully explain the phenomenon in all situations or settings."

The paper is available at
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer122/patterson112.html

The ONLINE JOURNAL OF DISTANCE LEARNING ADMINISTRATION (OJDLA) is a
free, peer-reviewed quarterly electronic journal published by the
Distance and Distributed Education Center, The State University of West
Georgia, 1603 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30118 USA; email:
distance at westga.edu; Web: http://www.westga.edu/~distance/

......................................................................

COLLEGE STUDENTS IN 2020

"The College of 2020: Students" is the first of the Chronicle Research
Services' three-part series of reports on what higher education will
look like in 2020. The report addresses such questions as

        What will change in how students view higher education and how
        to get it?

        How will colleges have to change to address students'
        expectations?

        What will be the make-up of the student body?

The complete report is available for purchase; a three-page Executive
Summary is available at no cost online at
http://research.chronicle.com/asset/TheCollegeof2020ExecutiveSummary.pdf?utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

Chronicle Research Services is part of the company that publishers THE
CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION. For more information go to
http://research.chronicle.com/

......................................................................

CELLPHONES AS INSTRUCTIONAL TOOLS

"Cellphones have been called 'the new paper and pencil' or 'the new
laptop,' and they could be in the hands of as many as 10 million to 15
million schoolchildren in the next few years."

EDUCATION WEEK's webinar "Cellphones as Instructional Tools" makes a
case for using cellphones as "mobile computers" that can be used for
students' learning activities both in and outside the classroom.
Although the presenters use examples from the K-12 educational
environment, instructors in higher education may find the presentation
of interest. A link to the archive of the webinar is available at
http://www.edweek.org/ew/marketplace/webinars/webinars.html
(Registration is required to access the broadcast; registration is
free.)

Education Week's webinars are sponsored by Editorial Projects in
Education, the non-profit organization that founded The Chronicle of
Higher Education. For more information, contact: Editorial Projects in
Education Inc., Suite 100, 6935 Arlington Road, Bethesda, MD 20814-5233
USA; tel: 800-346-1834; Web: http://www.edweek.org/

See also:

"50 Ways to Use Twitter in the College Classroom"
Online Colleges, June 6, 2009
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2009/06/08/50-ways-to-use-twitter-in-the-college-classroom/

......................................................................

TEN HIGHER EDUCATION IT ISSUES FOR 2009

In December 2008, the tenth annual EDUCAUSE Current Survey asked
participants to select the "five most-important IT issues out of a
selection of thirty-one in each of four areas: (1) issues that are
critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected to
increase in significance; (3) issues that demand the greatest amount of
the campus IT leader's time; and (4) issues that require the largest
expenditures of human and fiscal resources."

As for the previous six years, funding IT, administrative/ERP
information systems, and security rank at the top of the list of
college and university CIOs' concerns. This year, funding IT is the
number one concern, reflecting the economic downturn that most
institutions are experiencing.

The survey results and other materials, including readings related to
each of the ten issues, are available at
http://www.educause.edu/2009IssuesResources

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher
education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology.
The current membership comprises more than 1,900 colleges,
universities, and educational organizations, including 200
corporations, with 15,000 active members. EDUCAUSE has offices in
Boulder, CO, and Washington, DC. Learn more about EDUCAUSE at
http://www.educause.edu/

...................................................

BEING THERE FOR ONLINE STUDENTS

"Instructors who are new to online teaching often fear that their
courses will be impersonal and that connecting with their students will
not be possible in an online environment. Online students also fear
this 'missing instructor,' and feel isolated if they don't sense that
others are out there sharing their learning journey."

In "Increasing Instructor Presence in an Online Course" (EDUCATOR'S
VOICE, vol. 10, no. 4, July 8, 2009), Gail E. Krovitz provides tips to
help online instructors connect and stay connected with their students.
Her suggestions include "paying attention to the frequency and tone of
communication, having a strong presence in threaded discussions,
providing feedback and expectations. . . ." Krovitz also recommends
"increased instructor personalization" by posting instructor bios,
pictures, voice recordings, and the use of first person in
communications. The article is available at
http://www.ecollege.com/Educators_Voice.learn

Educator's Voice is published monthly by the eCollege Instructional
Design Team. For more information contact eCollege, eCollege Building,
4900 S. Monaco Street, Denver, CO 80237 USA; tel: 888-884-7325; fax:
303-873-7449; Web: http://www.ecollege.com/

......................................................................

INSIGHTS FROM LEARNING LEADERS

"Today's learning leaders face more challenges than ever before. How do
they deal with the economic and business climate we are all facing? How
should they make decisions? How should they effectively interface with
business leaders? How can they build (or re-build) a team for success?
All of these questions have become even more critical and challenging."

The LEARNING LEADER FIELDBOOK (The MASIE Center, 2009), edited by Bill
Byron Concevitch ,is "designed to bring you insight into the worlds and
daily realities of a prestigious group of learning leaders. We've
captured their thoughts and some guiding principles and actions that
they believe have aided their success." The book includes texts and
podcasts from nine learning officers in corporate and government
organizations.

The book is available for free downloading at
http://www.masie.com/fieldbook and, under a Creative Commons License,
can be distributed and duplicated.

The MASIE Center is an international e-lab and think tank located in
Saratoga Springs, NY. The Center is dedicated to exploring the
intersection of learning and technology. For more information, go to
http://www.masie.com/

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas at unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

"The Impending Demise of the University"
By Don Tapscott
EDGE, June 4, 2009
http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/tapscott09/tapscott09_index.html

"Universities are finally losing their monopoly on higher learning, as
the web inexorably becomes the dominant infrastructure for knowledge
serving both as a container and as a global platform for knowledge
exchange between people.

"Meanwhile on campus, there is fundamental challenge to the
foundational modus operandi of the University -- the model of pedagogy.
Specifically, there is a widening gap between the model of learning
offered by many big universities and the natural way that young people
who have grown up digital best learn."

Responses/rebuttals to Tapscott's essay by
Marc D. Hauser, Harvard University
and
James O'Donnell, Georgetown University
http://www.edge.org/discourse/demise.html

......................................................................

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